During The Ferment

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Where Do I Keep My Active Ferment?

Have your ferment prepped and ready to do its thing? Now it's time to find space in a cool (room temperature or slightly below), dark place to store it. Kitchen cupboards are a great and easy option for most people.

Learn more about where you should and shouldn't store your active ferment and how often you need to tend to it.

CONTINUE READING ABOUT STORING YOUR ACTIVE FERMENT  

What Temperature Should I Leave My Vegetable Ferment In? 

The ideal temperature to ferment in is 62F/17C - 65F/18C (average room temperature is 72F/22C). However, that precise temperature may be uncomfortable for you or not even possible in the heat of summer or dead of winter. Luckily there are ways to adjust your ferment to compensate for a cooler/warmer environment.

Learn more about how temperature impacts your ferment and how you can adjust your ferment to compensate. Includes a video explanation with Sandor Katz, the world’s leading fermentation revivalist and renowned author.  

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What Are Normal Signs to Expect During the Ferment?

Bubbles, cloudiness, and color leaching are all normal signs of an active ferment. You may see all of these signs or you may see none, either way there's no need to worry. 

Learn more about what to expect during an active ferment and how to troubleshoot your ferment if it's really 'not fermenting' after multiple days. Includes a video explanation with Sandor Katz, the world’s leading fermentation revivalist and renowned author.  

CONTINUE READING ABOUT THE SIGNS OF AN ACTIVE FERMENT  

Surface Growth: Preventing Kahm Yeast & Mold 

Surface growth is normal and natural, and most of the time is harmless. Kahm yeast, a pale wavy film, is the most common surface growth and the easiest to manage. Mold may also grow, which is a more concerning issue.

Learn more about surface growth, including how to prevent it, what's harmless and what isn't. Includes a video explanation with Sandor Katz, the world’s leading fermentation revivalist and renowned author.  

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Is It Done Yet? When to Stop Fermenting

You don't need to worry about "under" or "over" fermenting something. You should stop the ferment whenever it tastes right to you, which means you should test it every day or so to make sure you don't miss that golden hour. 

Learn more about when to stop fermenting, including the benefits of a short vs. long ferment. Includes a video explanation with Sandor Katz, the world’s leading fermentation revivalist and renowned author, on why it's important to taste along the way. 

CONTINUE READING ABOUT WHEN TO STOP FERMENTING  

"Over Fermenting:" is it Still Safe? 

First of all, let's drop the term "over fermented" because it's entirely subjective to personal preference. As long as your ferment has stayed submerged and no mold has grown, you don't need to worry about the safety of the food. Some people intentionally "over ferment" because they like mushy ferments! 

Learn more about "over fermenting," including a personal anecdote with Sandor Katz, the world’s leading fermentation revivalist and renowned author, in a video explanation.

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Should I Be Worried About Cross-Culturing? 

Do you have multiple ferments active in the same, small space? Although it is possible for cross-culturing/cross-contamination to happen, you likely don't have to worry.

Learn more about the real risks of cross-contamination, including advice from Sandor Katz, the world’s leading fermentation revivalist and renowned author, in a video explanation.

CONTINUE READING ABOUT CROSS-CULTURING  


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